virtual studio

Thoughts From An Intern Post #2

To finish my first week, I was able to spend Thursday and Friday completing different kinds of tasks. The day was filled activity. The first and most important of these tasks was to give tours of the facility to potential clients. Brooks is manager at the studio; therefore, he is typically the one who conducts these tours and he was more than willing to let me observe the process. It was interesting to hear about each person’s vision for their show, commercial, or creative video. For example, one client might want to shoot a talk show about sports, while another might want to create a series of short videos for a social media campaign. I began to see the endless possibilities, especially considering the level of technology that we have at our disposal. The objective of the tours is to showcase everything that L.A. Castle Studios has to offer. 

I also had the opportunity to observe Brett while editing on Final Cut Pro X. As an editor, I am experienced only on Adobe Premiere and Sony Vegas, so watching him work in Final Cut felt foreign. However, I quickly began to see the similarities between the systems. Later, I was able to try my hand at editing a short video and spend the rest of my afternoon experimenting with it. It was nice to be back behind the computer cutting clips. There is a huge contrast between production and non-production days; yet, there are things that I love about each. 

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Thoughts From An Intern Post #1

L.A. Castle Studios is proud to be able to host some of the best and brightest future entertainment industry leaders as interns. Our interns experience first hand what it’s like to work in a fast-paced production studio environment and they’re provided opportunities to learn, make mistakes, and grow in many facets of the studio; from the virtual system, to cameras, lighting, editing, and directing.

One of our interns for the summer has come all the way from South Carolina. She’s chronicling her experiences at L.A. Castle Studios and we’ll be posting them in blog form here.

Welcome to the studio, Rachel!

Thoughts from an Intern #1:

My name is Rachel and my first two days interning at L.A. Castle Studios in Burbank were nothing less than exhilarating. I have a fascination with the recording and editing process; and I knew a successful studio was the place to be in order to learn more. My goal while studying at L.A. Castle Studios is to observe the crew at work and get hands on experience using their advanced systems for virtual sets.

As a college junior at Anderson University in South Carolina, I wasn’t sure what to expect when walking into a true production studio. I have to admit, at first it was overwhelming. But soon, it became exciting. I was finally able to visualize all the moving parts of a production. When seeing everything play out, I have realized how much work goes into every shot. Production assistants are just as vital to the set as directors or the camera crew. Every single individual is striving to do their best in the job that they have been given. They are willing to invest their time to create something that they can be proud of. This is the kind of team that I wish to be a part of.

So far I have been jumping in when needed, and otherwise observing the professionals at work. I am excited to begin working behind the computer and seeing more of that L.A. Castle Studios has in store.

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Tilting Up -- Amazing Technology for Standing Sets

Traditional talk show and sitcom sets limit camera movement, especially for shots that tilt up. Why? Because studio lights are present above each set, and tilting up would reveal those lights, breaking the reality of the shot — especially on a sitcom. But what about standing sets at L.A. Castle Studios? Whether it's for a talk show, live sitcom show, game show, or even a full-length feature film, our standing sets allow full camera movement.

In the attached video, look at what happens when our jib operator tilts up. You see not the lights of our studio, but a kitchen atrium with a tree blowing in the wind. If you were to construct this home at any other studio in Burbank, it would be impossible for you to see a ceiling and the sky like this.

Now one small portion of our Italian Village set. Again, when our jib operator tilts up, you see the sky. Even though the actor is actually standing indoors.

Over to our warehouse set. Filming in a traditional warehouse would involve a very complicated lighting setup — which of course we have running on stage, but when we tilt up, you don’t see our real lights. You see the lights of the warehouse just as they should be. This can lead to some very cool shots that are impossible in a real warehouse.

One more example for you — Over to our space station. Again, when my jib operator tilts up, you see the ceiling of the space station. Our actor is still on our same stage in Burbank, but he sees himself in the space station and you see him there too. This space station is huge. It would take a million dollars or more to build. We have it for much less and it’s just as, if not more real than if it were really built on any other stage in Burbank.

Now I know you think this is bogus, but we invite you to our studio for a free tour and live demo of our amazing technology and show you in person, what this blog post is about. Give us a call at 818-861-7317.

"The Art of Stagecraft" at L.A. Castle Studios

L.A. Castle Studios was honored to have been the host location for a panel conversation on “The Art of Stagecraft”, presented by the Burbank Arts for All Foundation. 

Our studio was a unique location for the panel because the panelists were sitting on a green stage with green behind them. But, in the monitors surrounding our stage, the panel audience was seeing something totally different and in many ways, amazing. In the monitors, the background behind the panel was rotating to various beautiful locations as we brought up virtual sets powered by the Unreal Video Game Engine. From a beautiful penthouse virtual set overlooking Downtown Los Angeles by night to a space station virtual set, to a backyard virtual set, to the Wild West, London, and many places in-between, the audience was treated to a visual delight. 

L.A. Castle Studios’ virtual studio technology, powered by the Unreal Video Game Engine allows for productions like this, and movies, TV shows, talk shows, and more to take place anywhere you can dream; past, present, or future, on virtual sets powered by the Unreal Video Game engine. 

Take a look at the video below and while you watch, please keep a few things in mind. 

1. Think about how our revolutionary technology might work with your production — imagineer being able to quickly film in many locations, at the push of a button!

2. We did not stop the panel to configure lighting for each set. Our system allows for full control over stage and cinema lighting; just as if you were really filming on any of these locations.

3. The panelists were not mic’d individually — we apologize for any audio problems!

Thanks for reading and watching! Now be sure to book a tour of our production studio, located in Burbank, California. 

And, be sure to support the Burbank Arts for All Foundation here: http://www.burbankartsforall.org/support-us/

-L.A. Castle Studios Team